golf grip

golf grip

The area at the head of the golf club is called the golf grip. It allows golfers to grasp the club in their hands. Typically, it is constructed from a single, hollow piece of rubber that is slipped over the top of the club’s shaft. A 6-step plan to golf grip the golf club better…

The area at the head of the golf club is called the golf grip. It allows golfers to grasp the club in their hands. Typically, it is constructed from a single, hollow piece of rubber that is slipped over the top of the club’s shaft.

golf grip
golf grip

A 6-step plan to golf grip the golf club better than ever

The old-fashioned tip of holding your clubs such that your thumbs and forefingers form a V and point toward your back shoulder is no longer effective. Not even near. There is no one “best way” to place your hands on the handle; instead, there are several optimal ways to move efficiently and with human anatomy. The physique and range of motion of each player differ, frequently dramatically. You’ll be fighting yourself the entire time, running the danger of injury, and hitting cuts and hooks without ever understanding why if you don’t take these variances into account while taking your grip.

This is the clever technique to position your hands to maximize your inherent abilities and almost ensure a more steady ball flight..

1. Start with your lead hand

Since we all move in the same way, pointing both Vs toward your trail shoulder makes this assumption. No, we don’t. Every athlete has a different “natural motion.” Placing your lead hand on the handle in its natural position is the first step in developing a strong grip; a poor grip prevents it, while a good one highlights it. Stand straight and let your arms hang loosely by your sides to locate it. No golf ball, no stance. Take hold of a club now. That is all. You may now start and finish your swing on your own without help.

2. Do some fine-tuning

You may not get your perfect lead-hand hold with the practice above, but it will bring you quite close. The next step is to make sure that your lead-hand grasp and lead-hip mobility are in alignment. It’s magical when these line up. You may anticipate more of the same inconsistent behavior when they don’t. Assume a “dynamic impact” stance with your trail hand on the handle while keeping your weight on your front side, your hands in front, and your hips as wide as possible and the club in your address posture. Check your outcomes now (see below).

3. Slip on your trail hand

On the previous page, I requested you to refine your lead-hand hold by adding your trail hand to your grasp. Let’s now consider the trailhand addition carefully. Use your new leadhand position with the club positioned at a 45-degree angle in front of you. Put on your trail hand, taking care to insert the grip via the base of your fingers rather than your palm to allow for easy wrapping around the handle. Michael Jacobs, a fellow Top 100 Teacher, offers a fantastic analogy: Hold the handle in your trail hand, much like you would a suitcase. Perfect.

4. Do the cast drill

Keeping both hands on the grip, move the club over your trail shoulder (right) and then shoot it forward like a fishing line. This simple test replicates the trailarm elongation that happens on every downswing. Top 100 Hall of Famer Mike Adams has done a terrific job describing this nearautomatic extension and how crucial it is to match your lead hand’s mobility to your hips when it comes to your trail-hand grasp. After completing the cast test, review your findings (see below).

5. Tweak your trail hand

Your potential will be limited by the smallest mismatch between your trailhand grasp and the way your trail arm expands during your downswing. (If you slice a lot, this imbalance between grip and extension is probably the cause.) Hold the club after you’ve thrown it into the exercise and assess where the clubface is. Make adjustments with the help of the given guidelines.

6. Add the finishing touch

Once you locate your natural hold, it’s doubtful that both of your Vs will point in the direction of your trail shoulder. This is not only acceptable, but it’s also necessary to swing freely and avoid getting cut or hooked. Lastly, check to see if your fingers are separated You desire nothing. You will have more control over the clubface as a result of the increased surface area across which you may push and pull on the handle. With your fingers apart, you wouldn’t perform a bench press, right? You now have the ideal grasp. Give it a go!

As the head of teaching at The Landings Club in Savannah, Georgia, Joe Plecker is recognized as one of the GOLF Top 100 Teachers.

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